logoWustlSm  
Lee Epstein
trans
Lee Epsteing Ethan A.H. Shepley Distinguished University Professor
Untitled Page

 

THE OXFOR HANDBOOK OF U.S. JUDICIAL BEHAVIOR
Published in 2017. Oxford University Press

Lee Epstein & Stefanie A. Lindquist, editors

The Preface is here (uncorrected page proofs)

Part 1. Staffing the Court

  1. Nancy Scherer, Appointing Federal Judges
  2. Christine L. Nemacheck, Appointing Supreme Court Justices
  3. James L. Gibson and Michael J. Nelson, Judicial Elections: Judges and their 'New- Style' Constituencies
  4. Albert Yoon, Federal Judicial Tenure
  5. Artemus Ward, Law Clerks

Part II. The Litigation Process and Appellate Review

  1. Christina L. Boyd, Gatekeeping and Filtering in Trial Courts
  2. Donald R. Songer and Susan B. Haire, Access to Intermediate Appellate Courts
  3. Ryan J. Owens and James Sieja, Agenda-Setting on the U.S. Supreme Court
  4. Timothy R. Johnson, Courtroom Proceedings in U.S. Federal Courts

Part III. Judicial Decision-Making and Opinion Content

  1. Pamela C. Corley, Opinion Writing
  2. Thomas G. Hansford, Vertical Stare Decisis
  3. David Klein, Law in Judicial Decision- Making
  4. Chad L. Westerland, The Strategic Analysis of Judicial Behavior and the Separation of Powers
  5. Tom Clark, Judicial Review
  6. Tracey E. George and Taylor Grace Weaver, The Role of Personal Attributes and Social Backgrounds on Judging
  7. Justine D’Elia- Kueper and Jeffrey A. Segal, Ideology and Partisanship
  8. Lee Epstein and Jack Knight, The Economic Analysis of Judicial Behavior

Part IV. Judges and their Publics

  1. Lawrence Baum, Judges and their Audiences
  2. Jared Perkins and Paul M. Collins, Jr., Interest Groups and the Judiciary
  3. Thomas M. Keck, The Relationship between Courts and Legislatures
  4. Jeffrey L. Yates and Scott Boddery, Courts and Executives
  5. Rorie Solberg, Covering the Courts
  6. Joseph Daniel Ura and Alison Higgins, The Supreme Court and Public Opinion
  7. Matthew E. K. Hall, Judicial Impact

Part V. Methods and Approaches to Studying the Courts

  1. Eileen Braman, Cognition in the Courts: Analyzing the Use of Experiments to Study Legal Decision- Making
  2. Daniel E. Ho and Michael Morse, New Measurement Technologies: A Review and Application to Nuremberg and Justice Jackson
  3. Sara C. Benesh, The Use of Observational Data to Study Law and the Judiciary